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FlagsIt had been 15 years since I’d been to Nepal. As a result our buy-out of my former partner, our supply chain had broken down on so many fronts: malas, tingshaw, Ghanta & Dorje, gongs: we had run out of most of these items in the past year. And although I managed to find antique bowls, it always meant pulling a numerous reproductions into the net as well.  So our supply chain had to be repaired. It was ambitious to the point of crazy, really.  How was I to pack a three-week buying trip to Nepal into just nine days? That, in a country itself still in repair after the horrific earthquakes of April and May of this year. Still, nine days, plus the onerous travel time on either end, was all I could be away.  So it had to work.

But as it turned out, the upheaval from the earthquakes was only the beginning.  After a decade or longer of political infighting, On September 20th, Nepal formally adopted a constitution; its first, following a civil war that killed 13,000 people and ending 239 years of monarch rule. But it was not to be a unifying event that we had hoped. The Madhesi people of the southern plains, on Nepal’s border with India, complained of becoming “second class citizens”, and protested that the constitution diluted their vote. Almost everyone I talked to had a different understanding of the Madhesi situation, but protests became violent almost immediately gave rise to paralyzing strikes and 40 deaths. Violence broke out in Western Nepal, also for the charge of under-representation. The constitution created a second class citizenship level for children born of Nepalese mothers and foreign fathers.  Some called the constitution a “conservative backlash”.

Vehicles queue for petrol as the nation undergoes oil and fuel crisis in Bhadrakali, Kathmandu on Wednesday. Photo:Skanda Gautam

Vehicles queue for petrol as the nation undergoes oil and fuel crisis in Bhadrakali, Kathmandu on Wednesday. Photo:Skanda Gautam

Then India’s Prime Minister, Narendra Modri, spoke out against it, which created an uproar in Nepal and the great fuel crisis began. India, surrounding Nepal on three borders, closed their borders, and as Nepal was reliant for fuel from India, cars had no petrol; restaurants lacked cooking oil. The Nepali government rationed petrol to keep government and tourism vehicles running, but petrol sales to private vehicles slowed to a trickle. This created long lines of vehicles parked in the roads extending for blocks, some waiting for gas for two days. A competitor called me and asked it I was going to cancel my ticket.  “Jimmy Carter canceled,” he said.  “I’m not Jimmy Carter,” I observed.  I had to go. Canceling my ticket wasn’t an option, so off I went on my first buying trip to Nepal in 15 years in the middle of an unprecedented fuel crisis.

But the Nepalese are an endlessly resourceful people. As there were no taxis, I hired a driver to get around who procured

/fhwfgLdf s]xL lbgb]lv OGwgsf] cefjn] ubf{ eb|sfnLdf t]n eg{ kfnf] kv]{/ a;]sf ;j{;fw/0f hgtf . tl:j/ k|lbk/fh jGt /f;;

gas from the black market. So much had changed in Kathmandu. The air was clogged with pollution.  Where once platoons of bicycles were the Nepali middle class mode of transport, now armies of motorbikes choked the streets; entire families often sandwiched together on them. Nearly everyone wore masks, respiratory illness was rampant. In addition to the gas shortage, restaurants taped limited selections to their menus due to lack of cooking oil. Getting milk was a problem, so I never knew if Chai would be served. So this was not the Nepal I remembered.


In Thamel, the tourist section of Kathmandu, my perch at the Kathmandu Guest House was an oasis. The first hotel in Thamel, it had a huge, manicured garden trimmed with pots of bright marigolds and dotted with garlanded statues of the Buddha. My nine day visit coincided with Navarati;  (meaning nine nights) a holiday commemorating the triumph of the Goddess Durga over the evil demon Mahishasura.  The Autumnal Navaratri precedes Nepal’s biggest festival, Deshain (meaning 10th day), when the country sacrificed goats and went back to the villages to celebrate the festival with their families. My goal was to be out of the country before the bloodletting began. I booked full days with my singing bowl suppliers, while trying to carve out time to locate the vendors of incense and mala beads, and to hopefully connect with Seejan’s family, as well as do a little pilgrimage to Pashupatinath.

Boudha cropAs I’d heard from my suppliers many of the small Tibetan dealers where we used to buy the findings for our malas were breaking early for the holidays due to the gas shortage.  So on the day after I arrived, I set off with a Nepali friend to go to Boudhanath Stupa to try to find a Mala supplier I had not seen in 15 years. The Stoupa had suffered damage on its dome, and I was crestfallen to see the dome completely barren – its brick steeple and been removed, and the aerial array of prayer flags missing from the empty sky above.


Tibetan Mala #0001

The smooth, polished Bodhi seed malas we got from dealers 15 years ago were abundant – we used to sell them wholesale. Now shops and alleyways were overstuffed with garlands of malas with huge, course Bodhi seeds, and there was no evidence anywhere of our old quality.  We spent the afternoon flitting from shop to shop with samples, until, until we found one shop with one, lone mala of the smallest, smoothest Bodhi seeds I had seen in years. The young man behind the counter wanted a ransom for it, and it took us a little while to put it together, but he was in fact the son of our former supplier – in a new location. Once we were reacquainted, he combed his displays and pulled out some beads of our old quality – the last in stock he had.

ShaktiBowlsCropFifteen years ago, we had to go through rooms of antique bowls to find the good ones.  Now, I had to go through a warehouse of singing bowl reproductions – tens of thousands of them – just to find the real antiques, good or bad.  All of our suppliers had tons of this material – all of which, they insisted was “old”. Some of it was, but the great majority of it was new.  It was remarkable how beautifully crafted so much of it was.  Still, one supplier had been holding rare material for me for some months’ time.  When I got into the room with the material, a reverential feeling came over me.  I had never seen so much rare material in one place. My only limitations were time and budget, although I pushed the envelope on both. Then, The next push was to get it out before the city shut down.  I had so much competent help from my supplier’s workers!  I kept them working late until the Nepali equivalent of Christmas Eve.

CountrysideOn my one morning off, I paid a visit to Seejan in his village to see his Mother-in-law’s house and to meet his family.  Although his wife was doing Puja at their temple for Navaratri, I was able to connect with his daughter Ritisha, (9), and his son Yunish (6), and bring his mother-in-law a coconut from Pashupatinath. The countryside was rebuilding, but Seejan’s mother-in-law’s house was cobbled together by stacked bricks on a dirt floor.  They are still trying to amass enough funds to rebuild.  To rebuild a home in Nepal takes $3,000 – $5,000; they still have $2,500 to raise.  If you would like to help Seejan and his family rebuild, please donate to and write “Seejan” in your notes.

seejans house

Seejan’s mother-in-law’s house, in her family for generations, has been cobbled together with bricks and no mortar. She earns 450 Rupees a week as a field worker, the equivalent of $4.50.

back side of house

Seejan’s Mother-in-law’s house, side view

Seejans momShakti & Seejan's kids


Buddha Sakyamuni, 18th Century copper

At Bodhisattva, we list the approximate age of our singing bowls based on our evaluation of authentic wear on the metal, and date them “circa” their century of manufacture. “Circa” means “about”.  Absent a specific date inscribed on the piece, this term art historians use to indicate an approximate range 100 years before or after the manufacture.  For example, if we label a bowl “circa 18th Century”, that means we estimate that the date of manufacture could have occurred either 100 years prior to, or after, the 1700s.  It is important to note that even among art historians, experts sometimes disagree.

In the Eastern tradition, Indo-Tibetan painting and sculpture were considered to be a sacred art,
glorifying the subject rather than the artist, and hence were rarely signed by the artist or inscribed with a date.  In this cultural context, singing bowls also were rarely inscribed with any information. More often than not, inscriptions we see on antique bowls today appear to have been added after the original manufacture.

indotibetanbronzes_book_LRG1Bodhisattva’s system of dating singing bowls was developed based on the work of Indo-Tibetan bronze art historian Ulrich Von Schroeder, author of the authoritative volume “Indo-Tibetan Bronzes” published in 1981.  In an attempt to discover a system of dating Info-Tibetan sculpture, Von Schroeder assembled a collection of thousands of photographs of bronze sculptures acquired from collectors and museums  throughout the world.  Starting with the known, dated pieces, he identified them by stylistic characteristics and classified them together with other similar pieces. This body of work then showed similar levels of wear on the surface of the bronze from handling consistent with known ritual practices, such as touching and ritual washing.  Similarly, as we know how singing bowls were used and played throughout the centuries, we can observe the wear on the metal’s surface and conjecture an approximate date range of manufacture.

Tibetan Singing Bowl #8303 Circa 16th Century

Tibetan Singing Bowl #8303
Circa 16th Century

Over the past decade, due to the dwindling supply of authentic antique singing bowls, singing bowl manufacturers have taken to “aging” new bowls, adding fake patina, oxidation, and so forth. Patina, or the natural darkening of oxidizing bronze, is not a reliable way to determine the age of any antique bowl.  Conversely, if the patina of an antique has been stripped in the cleaning process before export, it will have a bright golden finish with little or no patina at all.  For example, the exterior surface of this circa 16th century singing bowl (pictured left) has been preserved beautifully, and has a lustrous, medium-gold, matte finish. Yet, on closer observation, its rim is bright, shiny gold with a reflective finish. This is because we gently sanded the exterior of the rim to remove any oxidation so we would record a clean rim tone. To the untrained eye, this bowl could appear new. So the presence of patina, or its absence, is a factor in the dating of singing bowls, but not a determining one.


Click photo to enlarge

To make matters more challenging, in the last few years suppliers have been sanding the surface of singing bowls for export. We suspect this might be an attempt to shortcut cleaning process for oxidized antiques to make them more presentable for market.  We are working with our suppliers to try to discontinue this practice in order to conserve the beautiful, original surface of antique singing bowls. The other motivation for sanding the bowls may be simply fraudulent:  to smooth the appearance of brand new bowls to make them look old. The Highwall singing bowl pictured to the right was dated circa 18th century by a prominent singing bowl “expert”, despite the excessive sanding marks on its exterior. Sanding marks should not be confused with the lighter, surfaces scratches created by cleaning with the scruffy part of a kitchen sponge, which almost all singing bowls have by the time they reach us, unfortunately. Our policy regarding sanded bowls is that if so much of the original surface of a bowl has been removed that we can no longer make an educated estimate of a bowl’s date range of manufacture, we will discount these bowls and sell them as undated, Master-Quality® Bowls in the New Singing Bowl section of our website. We also offer some good sounding reproductions in this section as well.

We tend to be conservative in our dating.  In the art world, antiques are considered to be at least 100 years old, or older.  If a Master-quality® singing bowl presents some wear but not enough to substantiate 100 years of age, we will date it circa 20th century. We include some older looking, circa 20th century, Master-quality® bowls in our antique galleries, but we do not certify them as antiques. The truth is, the great majority of singing bowls sold online are newly manufactured. There are simply not enough antiques left for dozens of singing bowl providers to have a supply of hundreds of antique singing bowls year in and year out.

It is extremely hard to determine if a bowl is authentic by a picture, as pictures can be altered and are not high enough resolution to provide enough detail. We do not offer appraisals for that reason. But here are some considerations to keep in mind when buying an antique singing bowl on the internet:

  1.  Does the dealer offer an estimated date range of the antiques manufacture? If a dealer is reluctant to estimate the age of a bowl, it either means the dealer is not qualified to do so, or that the bowl may not actually be an antique at all. Saying a bowl is “old” can mean it’s one year, one month or one week old!  Saying its “vintage” doesn’t mean its antique, either.
  2. Look for a CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY. If a vendor is not able to offer one, again, it may be because the vendor is reluctant to put their claim of antiquity in writing. At Bodhisattva, we include a Certificate of Authenticity with all of our Master-quality® antique singing bowls.
  3. Look for a “MONEY-BACK” guarantee, as opposed to a “SATISFACTION GUARANTEE”. At Bodhisattva, we offer a 100% product refund (minus a 10% re-stocking fee) if a bowl is returned in re-saleable condition within 30 days of the date of the invoice.  Remember, if you buying directly from Asia, returns are not an option.
  4. Look for a track record. The longer a company has been in business, the better. Bodhisattva has been selling antique singing bowls at the museum and gallery level since 1996. Our products have been sold at the San Francisco Art Museum, the Mingei International Museum in San Diego and the Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, California.

Rare Void Cup #8302
Circa 16th Century

As with everything else, the law of supply and demand controls the market – the less there is of something, the more it will cost.  If you are see antiques advertised for bargain-basement  prices, be aware there’s a reason.  They may not be antiques – or, often, there may be a qualitative reason the bowl is being offered cheaply.  For example, in our Special Deal section, we offer antiques that are lacking in sound qualities, and therefore they are sold for much less. After all, authentic age is only one of the five criteria we use for rating a Master-quality® singing bowl:  it must also have great balance of harmonics, good volume, long-lasting sustain and be easy to play.
Finally, remember that there are many wonderful, contemporary singing bowls available for very reasonable prices that need to be made into antiques for future generations. But if it’s a great quality, antique singing bowl you’re looking for now, the old adage “you get what you pay for” really applies. We welcome you to browse our Small, Medium, Large and Rare and Museum Quality galleries and be absolutely confident you’re getting among the finest, authentic antique singing bowls available in the world.

At 11:56 am Saturday, April 25th 2015, the Kathmandu valley and surrounding areas were devastated by a 7.8 earthquake.  The death toll mounts daily, so by the time you read this, today’s count of 7300 lives lost will be heartbreakingly out of date.  The country’s economy has left a vulnerable, impoverished population in the countryside without aid of its young men, who have emigrated to Gulf states for labor and are unable to return due to feudal government work policies of those governments.  So elderly villagers have been left to dig their dead out of the rubble, with aid supplies backlogged at the airport due to government red tape.


I had dreaded this day for years.  Back in 2001, I had read in a New York Times article that Nepal was overdue for a major earthquake.  This article worried me, because so much of Kathmandu was built with brick construction.

A few weeks later, the morning of August 28th – also on a Tuesday morning – I awoke from an early morning nightmare.  I had seen people buried in mountains of bricks and rubble.  Panicked, I picked up the phone and called the Hotel Norbu Linka in Thamel where we stayed when in Nepal, and asked the staff if everything was OK.  Everything was fine.  But two weeks later to the hour, I would awake to news of September 11th, 2001.  That was also a Tuesday morning.

Things had changed so much in these 14 years.  By the time I got the news of the Nepal quake, I could log into Google’s People Finder app for the Nepal earthquake and knew instantly that my most reliable supplier and a good friend were marked as safe.  But it took days to learn the fate of others. I could not reach Seejan Basnet, my account rep for our shipping company, who was off-line on Skype.  For years, he was the one who arranged for our shipments and prepared my statements.  But business relationships are still relationships, and all weekend I was hammering away on Skype, Google and email trying to get any information I could. Finally, early Monday morning, my phone flared up.

Like so many thousands of other Nepalis, his family’s home was completely destroyed.  What follows are excerpts of four days worth of Skype exchanges, as we struggled to get him and his family out of open fields and into a temporary room.  At Seejan’s request, I have corrected some spelling.  The rest of the communications are as they happened:

[4/26/2015 2:26:09 PM] Shakti: Are you ok???
[4/27/2015 12:15:27 AM] *** Missed call from seejan basnet. ***
[4/27/2015 12:15:54 AM] *** Missed call from seejan basnet. ***
[4/27/2015 12:16:18 AM] seejan basnet: Im safe
[4/27/2015 12:16:33 AM] seejan basnet: But we lost a lot of lives…..
[4/27/2015 12:16:49 AM] seejan basnet: We are completely lost evthg
[4/27/2015 12:17:08 AM] seejan basnet: Pls pray for us
[4/27/2015 12:17:20 AM] seejan basnet: Tremor still hitting
[4/27/2015 12:17:36 AM] seejan basnet: We all are living outside in field
[4/27/2015 12:17:48 AM] seejan basnet: No home food water medicine
[4/27/2015 12:17:58 AM] seejan basnet: Situation is really bad
[4/27/2015 12:33:41 AM] Shakti: Seejan did everyone at Speedway survive? Is the building still there? I am trying to raise funds to send to disaster relief agencies. Please let me know if sending $$ will help u. I’m praying for u all
[4/27/2015 12:36:09 AM] Shakti: Also please let me know which agencies are helping the most-
[4/27/2015 1:19:28 AM] seejan basnet: One of our staff died today
[4/27/2015 1:19:33 AM] seejan basnet: Other safe
[4/27/2015 1:19:40 AM] seejan basnet: Crying for help
[4/27/2015 1:20:16 AM] seejan basnet: No food water medicine
[4/27/2015 7:58:40 AM] Shakti: I deeply regret your loss, Seejan. I am praying for you and your families. We will do everything we can to raise money to get you aid.
[4/27/2015 9:47:15 PM] seejan basnet: Thk you
[4/27/2015 9:49:29 PM] Shakti: I am sending our a newsletter tonight to 4,500 people asking for financial support to the major disaster relief organizations. Have you started to see some supplies yet?
[4/27/2015 9:49:56 PM] seejan basnet: Not yet
[4/27/2015 9:50:05 PM] seejan basnet: Every thg running out soon
[4/27/2015 9:50:19 PM] seejan basnet: Now serious issue is health problem
[4/27/2015 9:50:50 PM] seejan basnet: Epidemic disease like diarrhea fever n flu increasing
[4/27/2015 9:52:35 PM] Shakti: President just authorized 10 million in disaster relief for Nepal. there are many organizations like Red Cross UNICEF, Doctors Without Borders, AmeriCares, etc who have teams there already. Help is coming.
[4/27/2015 9:58:52 PM] Shakti: Please let me know if there is anything I can do for you, Seejan.

Seejann family Seejan's family: Mother-in-law, background;  wife, Khadka; Raju, 14; younger boy Yunish, 6; Ritisha, 10.  At left, sister-in-law and nephew.

Seejan’s family: Mother-in-law, background; wife, Khadka; Raju, 14; younger boy Yunish, 6; Ritisha, 10. At left, sister-in-law and nephew.

[4/27/2015 9:59:29 PM] Shakti: Please have faith.
[4/27/2015 10:02:15 PM] seejan basnet: Ok shakti ….
[4/27/2015 10:03:01 PM] seejan basnet: Currently my wife’s house is completely damage and 4 children n two old age woman compel to live out in open sky

[4/27/2015 10:03:17 PM] seejan basnet: If u cld do some thg pls that wld be great
[4/27/2015 10:03:50 PM] Shakti: How can I help?
[4/27/2015 10:03:53 PM] seejan basnet: Its marter (sic) for lived one than the dead
[4/27/2015 10:04:25 PM] seejan basnet: Any fund more or less to rebuild temporary shelter
[4/27/2015 10:04:31 PM] Shakti: If I send you some money Western Union, will it help you?
[4/27/2015 10:04:47 PM] seejan basnet: Jst my plead dnt take it negativly
[4/27/2015 10:05:02 PM] seejan basnet: We have lost evythg
[4/27/2015 10:05:15 PM] Shakti: OK send me your Western Union details. We will send money tomorrow.
[4/27/2015 10:05:26 PM] seejan basnet: Thank u so much
[4/27/2015 10:05:53 PM] Shakti: Of course. I can’t send much but I will do my best. How are you re-charging your phone?
[4/27/2015 10:08:07 PM] seejan basnet: Any amount i would be thankful
[4/27/2015 10:08:27 PM] seejan basnet: Walking 5 km to chg battery
[4/27/2015 10:09:32 PM] Shakti: Ok no phone call then. Save your battery. Is your dog ok?

[4/27/2015 10:09:55 PM] seejan basnet: Dog ok both
[4/27/2015 10:10:04 PM] seejan basnet: Actually they saved us
[4/27/2015 10:10:20 PM] seejan basnet: They were one who noticed it first
[4/27/2015 10:10:58 PM] Shakti: Good news amidst so much bad.

[4/27/2015 10:11:28 PM] Shakti: How did you dogs save you?
[4/27/2015 10:12:33 PM] seejan basnet: They bark with untensionly (sic) we cld know somethg bad going to happen
[4/27/2015 10:12:37 PM] seejan basnet: We were alert
[4/27/2015 10:12:43 PM] seejan basnet: Alert save us
[4/27/2015 10:13:03 PM] Shakti: Good dogs! :)
[4/27/2015 10:13:17 PM] seejan basnet: They are
[4/27/2015 10:17:00 PM] Shakti: OK – one last question. Did Speedway survive? Is the buidling o?

[4/27/2015 10:17:04 PM] Shakti: OK?

[4/27/2015 10:17:24 PM] seejan basnet: Building ok
[4/27/2015 10:17:29 PM] seejan basnet: One staff dead
[4/27/2015 10:17:35 PM] seejan basnet: Buried alive
[4/27/2015 10:17:42 PM] seejan basnet: Dead after a day
[4/27/2015 10:19:07 PM] Shakti: It is so tragic. Was it someone I know?
[4/27/2015 10:19:21 PM] seejan basnet: He was new
[4/27/2015 10:19:31 PM] seejan basnet: 21 year of age in warehouse
[4/27/2015 10:21:03 PM] Shakti: I am so grateful the rest of you survived. OK I’m going to sign off and get this newsletter out. We are offering to give 5% of all singing bowl sales to disaster relief. I hope to raise more $$. I will be in touch tomorrow. Keep the faith! Good bye for now.
[4/27/2015 10:22:00 PM] seejan basnet: Thk you and good bye
[4/27/2015 10:22:04 PM] seejan basnet: Namaste

[4/27/2015 11:16:36 PM] Shakti: is this your family?
[4/27/2015 11:16:44 PM] seejan basnet: Yes

[4/27/2015 11:17:06 PM] seejan basnet: Mother in law n children
[4/27/2015 11:17:50 PM] seejan basnet: Water shelter n medicine 1st need
[4/27/2015 11:18:03 PM] seejan basnet: No government representative till now
[4/27/2015 11:18:20 PM] seejan basnet: So i m asking help directly from donortent
[4/27/2015 11:19:24 PM] Shakti: what is your email
[4/27/2015 11:19:46 PM] seejan basnet:
[4/27/2015 11:27:12 PM] Shakti: I heard it was raining – is that not true?
[4/27/2015 11:28:27 PM] seejan basnet: It was raining but not continuously
[4/27/2015 11:28:36 PM] seejan basnet: With pause
[4/27/2015 11:30:12 PM] Shakti: good thing
[4/27/2015 11:32:59 PM] seejan basnet: Specially children are at vulnerable


Tuesday April 28th, after some delays with Western Union due to difficulties on the Nepal side, I was able to wire a donation to Seejan. By then, the family was living in a tent encampment, alongside hundreds of displaced Nepalis riding out the aftershocks.

[4/29/2015 8:48:44 AM] seejan basnet: I got money and hand over to my mother in law she was very happy…..She was very pleased to you

[4/29/2015 8:48:57 AM] seejan basnet: She insisted me to show your pic

[4/29/2015 8:49:35 AM] seejan basnet: She thank u a lot

[4/29/2015 8:52:03 AM] Shakti: I hope this gift makes it a little easier for your family. Please let me know what happens with your family next. Is there other shelter you can find?

4/29/2015 8:55:00 AM] seejan basnet: She was very happy how outer world reacted to her needWestern Union

[4/29/2015 8:55:04 AM] Shakti: How can we get you out of that tent, Seejan?
[4/29/2015 8:55:27 AM] seejan basnet: Actual its nightmare to get fund or some aid from nepal government
[4/29/2015 8:55:47 AM] seejan basnet: There is corrupt people they use it for themselves
[4/29/2015 8:56:12 AM] seejan basnet: Still im trying to collect fund
[4/29/2015 8:56:20 AM] seejan basnet: Fund still far not enough
[4/29/2015 11:16:16 AM] Shakti: Let me know how much you need to rent a room in a flat so you can get out of the tent.
[4/29/2015 11:16:27 AM] Shakti: I will try to raise the $$ for you
[4/29/2015 12:48:58 PM] seejan basnet: Ok i will search room tomorrow
[4/29/2015 12:49:16 PM] seejan basnet: Let you know if i get some
[4/29/2015 12:49:20 PM] Shakti: Have a good night Seejan! :)
[4/29/2015 12:49:33 PM] seejan basnet: Thk you very much again
[4/29/2015 12:49:43 PM] Shakti: You’re so welcome
[4/29/2015 12:50:25 PM] seejan basnet: Good nite
[4/29/2015 12:50:36 PM] seejan basnet: Actually its late in nepal
[4/29/2015 12:50:44 PM] seejan basnet: We need to sleep
[4/29/2015 12:51:11 PM] seejan basnet: But this after shock compel us to wake whole night up
[4/29/2015 12:52:40 PM] Shakti: Oh. I can imagine the body is on alert. Try to rest your mind then. Your family is safe. Everything is going to be all right.
[4/29/2015 12:53:33 PM] seejan basnet: Every asleep im the one guarding
[4/29/2015 12:54:00 PM] seejan basnet: Every one asleep…

The next morning, I heard that Seejan had rented a room about 500 meters from his mother-in-law’s property.  Between widespread property damage and the crush of homeless families looking for shelter, the laws of supply and demand had more than tripled rents in the area.  It is difficult for the family to make the adjustment to living in one room, but they are grateful to have it.  Max and Lusi, the family dogs, are staying with Seejan’s brother for now. 

Family in roomBut Seejan’s family needs help. He has drained his account and does not make enough to build temporary housing, which he estimates would cost about $2,000.00.  If you wish to help Seejan and his family get back on their feet, please donate via PayPal to and put “Seejan” in the notes.

We will be updating this blog regularly until we can help him build temporary housing.  We are grateful for any support you can give.

Max & Lusi, hero dogs

Max & Lusi, hero dogs



ImageOur long time customer Ken Glowacki is a practitioner of traditional Chinese medicine in Portland, Oregon.  He has been building his set of high quality, antique Tibetan bowls with us since 2008.  He was a bit of an enigma, and we never had a single conversation about what his goals were for his collection, or for what purpose he was using singing bowls.  He gravitated towards large, sonorous Highwalls and rare Double-blues whose frequencies bore no obvious tonal relationship to each other.  It wasn’t until much later we discovered that he was using the bowls in his practice, and he kindly offered to guest blog about how he uses singing bowls in acupuncture therapy.

I would like to send you a treatment that I did where I integrated acupuncture with sound therapy.  I wrote it up as if I would submit it for colleagues to understand what I was doing.  It might be very different from other people who are doing sound therapy.  However, it might be useful for other readers of yours.

Overall, I use my singing bowls at various times to affect the meridian flow of Qi.  I measure this by observing the patient’s reaction.  I use pulse diagnosis for a large part of my treatment.  I use it to diagnose and measure the response of the treatment.  There are bowl combinations that I use for a Yin/Yang balancing through the Conception and Governing Vessels.  I use other bowls to break up stagnation.  I use a triplet to affect what I have noticed to be the Shao Yang channels.  These are the Gallbladder and Triple Burner channels.  I continue to investigate and enjoy using my bowls.  I want to investigate how these bowls affect the deeper constitutional levels.  My Earth Gong helps patients gain clarity and presence of mind.

Female, 39 y.o., complaining of irregular heart beat, palpitations, flooding sensation in chest at times, tachycardia, high blood pressure, swollen feet and ankles.  She had a series of western diagnostic tests: echocardiogram, EKG, blood panel for kidney, liver and thyroid function.  All came back normal.  She explained that she experiences frontal headaches, feeling faint, at times either a cold or hot gripping sensation at her sternum and a radiating sensation to her shoulders.

She is taking a Chinese herbal formula and supplements.

Pulse taking: Du Mai, Yin Chao Mai, Ht deficiency, irregular, irregular, slightly rapid

Abdomen palpation: Ren Mai/Du Mai pattern

Meridian Palpation: The following points were imbalanced: Ht 7, SI 3, Kid 8.

Chinese diagnosis: Ren and Du Mai imbalance, Ht Luo fullness

Acupuncture treatment: SI 3 (left), Lu 7 (right), Kid 6 (left), Kid 8 (right)

Sound Therapy –

GLOWAKI INTThe pulse was taken continuously throughout the treatment.  Ting shas were used initially to diagnose blocked and deficient areas through the 7 chakra areas.  Three bowls were used first to create a solid field where Qi could flow throughout the most exterior areas of the body.  A central line with two bowls was created for ascending and descending of Qi through the midline.  At this point, I chose to work with the Earth gong to send waves up through the feet, eventually have them crash over the top of the head.  I continuously checked the patient’s pulse.  I came back to a gentle wave pattern ebbing and flowing in an ascending and descending manner.  When the pulse evened out, I took a bowl that had both a solar plexus and third eye tone to work on these areas.  I used one bowl off to the side as a sentinel to call back to the patient.  This led back to the original three bowls first to descend Qi from the head and to circulate Qi around the exterior.  The image that came to mind was a bubble forming around the patient.

Essential oils were chosen to affect the limbic system in the brain and remind it of the peaceful state of mind and body at the end of the treatment.  These oils affect the Heart Luo vessel.

Patient sent home with a blend of essential oils of Red Mandarin, Ylang-Ylang and Sandalwood to be applied at points, Ht 7, Ht 5.

She will continue to take the Chinese herbal formula.

Myers Lemon tree blossom.  Photo by Shaki

Meyer Lemon tree blossom. Photo by Shakti

Spring has come to Bodhisattva. Our patio is a walking tour of intoxicating scents.  Upon entering our gate, one is flanked on one side by a flowering Meyer Lemon tree and on the other, an out of control Pink Jasmine vine; across the patio, an exuberant, white-blossomed Pittisporum tree – all blooming at once.  Outside my office window at the rear of the building, there is a small, potted Ficus tree whose sole function is to add some green to the view.  In it, my gardener discovered a nest with two baby Hummingbirds.

Pink Jasmine. Photo by Shakti

Pink Jasmine. Photo by Shakti

Their Ruby-throated mother is a frequent visitor to the Hummingbird feeder outside the office entrance.  She swoops in to have a meal, and then lights upon a furled palm frond and seems to watch us from that perch.  She feeds every hour or so every day, often buzzing me as I walk from the office across the patio to my house.  I have often wondered if she’s the same Hummingbird that got caught in the peach tree net last Summer.

Peach Tree blossoms.  Photo by Shakti

Peach Tree blossoms. Photo by Shakti

I have an old peach tree that despite its age, blesses us with quite a bit of fruit.  We net it every Summer to keep the resident squirrels from plundering the lot.  One afternoon, as I was leaving the house, I noticed that a hummingbird had penetrated the net but couldn’t find her way out.  So I folded up some flaps in the net, and placed a red hibiscus flower near the gap, hoping to attract the bird to the opening.  I left for a couple of hours, and when I returned, I didn’t see the her.  Relieved, I assumed that she had found her way out – until on closer look about an hour later, I spotted her limp body laying motionless in the net.  She had impaled her tiny head through one of the holes in the netting, the nylon tightly cutting into her neck.  I took her in my hand, and she peeped piteously, barely moving.  I could see her life ebbing from her quickly.

I had to free her from the net; then I could worry about how to free her head.  She had exhausted all her energy trying to escape for those hours so she was dangerously depleted.  I ran into the house and got scissors, and cut doing my best not to pull the netting tighter.  It was awkward trying to hold the net steady, cutting, while still trying to support her.  To my horror, as I cut the last strand of nylon, she slipped from my hand and fell to the ground.  I was so disappointed and angry with my clumsiness.  I scooped her up, resolving to save her if I could, and imagined myself  a bird paramedic on one of those Animal Planet channel shows.

I would need an ultra-thin scissor to cut the netting from around her neck.  I pulled my grandmother’s antique, Swan shaped eyebrow scissors from the bathroom cabinet for the job.  Next, I plucked the jar of hummingbird nectar from the fridge, and dug through the company silverware drawer to find a dropper.  Finally, I grabbed the hummingbird feeder, in case I could entice her to eat without force feeding her.  I chose Bodhisattva’s shipping table to operate, rested her on some paper towels, and went to work.

By now, it was early evening.  The Sun was dropping into the West behind the back house so the office was getting dark.  I turned on the brightest lights I could, and strained to see if I could fit the base of the eyebrow scissors under the nylon strand.  There was just enough room to coax the blade over her exposed, delicate skin where her feathers had shed from the abrasion of the net. It was surreal to see the Swan headed scissors cutting the Hummingbird’s head free.  But her new found freedom did not seem to register with her; her little chest was heaving, her eyes half open, her heart pounding.  It would be a race against time to get some food into her.  I spoke to her all the while, using the sound healing tool of a soft, calming voice to reassure her.

I rested her upon the peg of the feeder, which her feet instinctively clutched.  Gently, I leaned her beak into the opening of the feeder.  She was so weak she just rested there, unable to move.  I would have to force feed her.


Male Ruby-Throated Hummingbird @ BTC Feeder. Photo by Chris Saul

It’s hard to overstate how tiny a humming bird beak is, and hers’ was shut tight.  With her little feet still gripping the peg of the feeder, I steadied her body with one hand and lightly tapped the dropper against her beak.  She looked up at me dazed; it seemed as that was the first time we really made eye contact.  I tapped again and squeezed a single drop of the fluid so that it balled up at the tip of her beak.

My joy that she had started to suck down the fluid was short lived, because with the first drop, she disappeared, zooming straight up so fast I couldn’t even tell whether she had flown into a recessed lighting panel, or into the loft above the office.  Outside, the long shadows had given way to twilight.  This was not good.

Cursing, I dusted the pine needles, spiders and accumulated dirt off the ladder outside and hauled it into the office to investigate the lighting panel.  She wasn’t there.  That would mean she would be in the loft, where there were hundreds of places a bird the size of my index finger could hide.  I had to find her before it got dark.  She didn’t have enough calories to last the night.

Our loft is a small space- not more than 50 cubic feet maybe, but it’s used for storage so it was packed with stuff.  I rifled between tubs of zafus and stacked Himalayan crates stocked with singing bowl cushions.  No Hummingbird.  The space is lined with double-paned windows, and there is one open window in which a square, exhaust fan sits.  I peered through the blades of the fan.  Of course – there she was, clinging to the screen of the open window in a ¾” space between the screen and the fan.  There was so little room – how was I going to get her out of there?  If I removed the fan, she would just fly out the other side of the loft, which opened into my office crammed with even more places for her to hide.  So I couldn’t let her escape.  I grabbed a roll of blue tape and sealed all the openings between the fan and the screen, except the one which would give me access to her.

The fan was to my left and it was such a tight space, there was nowhere to fit my right shoulder so I was unable reach my right hand into it.  I would have to flatten my body against the wall and grasp her with my less dexterous, left hand.  The light was quickly fading, and I knew I only had one shot at this.  I gave her my game plan:

Ok, little hummingbird.  You can’t spend the night in here, you won’t make it.  You have to be free.  I’m going to reach my hand in here.  You need to let me take you.  I won’t hurt you, OK?

With a deep, even breath, I reached in and simply closed my hand around her.  Extricating her little claws from the screen, I pulled her free.  Tumbling down the loft ladder, I bounded for the patio door and opened my hand.  She swooped up and perched on tops of the Temple bamboo, swaying in the Western glow of the summer evening.  She was going to be fine.  I made a note to myself; if you ever have to rescue a Hummingbird again, work outdoors.


Baby Hummingbirds. Photo by Gina Draklich

So of course, when we discovered our Hummingbird had babies, it made me all the more sure that our resident Hummingbird was the same one from last summer; as if she had felt safe to build her nest here.  We were only aware of the babies for a few days.  I would watch them out my office window with binoculars so as not to disturb them.  Luckily, the tree was wrapped in netting so the cats couldn’t scale it; and it was such a quiet space that it was naturally sheltered from larger, winged predators.  The nest was only the size of a Japanese tea cup; just enough room for the diminutive bodies of the two chicks; their heads and tips of their tails sticking out the top of the nest.  They stayed so still, only animating when their Mom came to feed them.  We figured that remaining motionless must be a defense mechanism, their black eyes staring like itty-bitty, jet beads.

And as is the way of nature, one morning they were gone.  I kept staring at the nest with the binoculars; thinking perhaps that somehow, they’d reappear.  They did not.  I don’t know where they went.  I did see what looked like a new, full grown hummingbird at the feeder.  I read that that by the time they fledge they are actually bigger than their Mom, so I don’t know that I would recognize them if I did see them.  A glum, empty nest syndrome settled on our office.

But the mother seems to be in great spirits.  She’s eating up a storm.  She sits on her perch, watching us, chirping and whooshing across the patio, her home.  We’ll leave the nest in the Ficus for next year, as apparently they reuse them.  Life is unfolding in its perfect rhythm and in its time.  It’s only the mind that is rushing by, while wanting time to stand still.

Recently, while reading about the immolations that have been spreading through Tibet, I came across a video on YouTube of the Tibetan National Anthem.  Even though I have been in the Dharma community since coming to Southern California in 1994, I had never knowingly heard it played or sung.  Of all of the Sutras I have heard and all of the Tibetan gatherings I have attended, no one had ever identified any piece of music as the anthem of Tibet.  I didn’t know they had one.  So when I found it on YouTube,  I was surprised;  when I heard it, I was captivated.

Known as Gyallu, the lyrics are based on the teachings of the Buddha.  They are attributed to Trijang Rinpoche, who was a spiritual guide to the 14th Dalai Lama for some 40 years.  Apparently, the lyrics were set to an ancient piece of sacred music; I would love to know the Sutra it comes from. The melody was sinuous and elevating, and seemed to exude hope.  It had a hook in it, too.  The first version I ran across was Camerata of St. John’s version, a brilliant performance with a soulful lead cello accompanied by intervals of violent string arrangements.  It  sounded like it was in the key of F#.  I listened to it over and over.

For the past few years at Bodhisattva, it has been my pleasure to play Christmas carols on a set of Tibetan singing bowls and shoot a little video of it.  So every year as the Christmas season approaches, I start mulling which Christmas carol I’d like to play.  But by now it was late November, and Gyallu was staying with me. I was headed to The Rubin Museum in New York for their Serai event right after Thanksgiving.  The more I thought about it, visualizing myself spending a week there, cocooned in its spiraling galleries of Himalayan Sacred Art, the less likely I was going to feel like playing “I heard the Bells on Christmas Day” on Tibetan bowls.  As the immolations quickened, it seemed all the more important that this hymn should be heard.


So, Gyallu it was.  The only trouble was going to be learning the melody in less than 7 days time, while flying to New York, setting up a booth at The Rubin Museum of Art, doing a five-day trunk show and giving some singing bowl workshops.  I realized that as haunting as Gyallu was in the key Camerata had played it in, it was too hard a key for me.  To begin with,  I’m not at all gifted with the kind of ear where I can hear something once or twice and pick up on it.  Learning Christmas carols on the bowls is easy:  I’ve heard those melodies since I was in the womb.  Although this melody had very simple scales in it, it seemed labyrinthian to me.

We know that music is a mnemonic device. What I didn’t realize is how handy it is to have words to find our way around a piece of music.  There wasn’t time to learn both.  Finally, I found the music in a G major key which simplified learning the tune.  I hadn’t had the occasion to read music since I was around 14, and this music was charted by a Westerner.  Although I heard wide variations in the recordings by Tibetan artists, I used it as a guide.  It goes something like this:


The short time frame meant that would mean I had to practice it at night.  As  I had to commute out to my friend’s house in Staten Island every evening, that meant lugging about 15 pounds of bronze bowls on the subway and the ferry each night.  Which I did, plugging into a Tibetan version on YouTube while steaming past the Statue of Liberty.  It was an emotional juxtaposition for me, these nightly sightings of our national symbol of freedom, listening to this song of spiritual liberation sung by a people who are not free to sing it in their own homeland.  I contemplated our own violent path to independence, and wondered what path Tibet can take to spiritual and cultural  freedom.  It seems that the quest for Tibetan autonomy is perennially pushed off the front page, with no artillery or rockets to attract headlines.  It is a quiet struggle, where monks as well as laypeople feel the imperative to be free is more important than life itself.  I stared at Lady Liberty’s face.  She is steadfast, resolute, fearless.  She inspired me to never give up hope for Tibet.

Halfway through the Serai trunk show, I approached Dawn Eshelman, programming manager at The Rubin, and asked if it would be possible to shoot our video at  The Rubin.  Graciously, she and the Rubin management allowed us to use the theater Sunday, at the end of the workshop.  Theo Dorian, a friend from numerous film classes in our college days, generously gave us his time to shoot.  Susan Lamoureaux supported us with access to lighting and the Rubin’s remarkable sound system, and let us keep shooting til the Museum’s doors were closed.  Prisanee Suwanwatana, manager of the Rubin Shop, very kindly made sure our booth was covered, and  stayed late that night so we could pack up our bowls and our gear.  The staff at the Rubin were so amazingly supportive.  My thanks to Tashi Choedron, the beautiful Tibetan museum tour guide, for her encouragement.

Although The Dalai Lama himself makes no call for Tibet’s independence from China in any way, he tireless asks of us to support Tibetans in their quest to win the basic human right to practice their religion in peace and to preserve their culture for future generations.  If you would like learn more about what you can do to help, please visit International Campaign for Tibet.


Om Mani Padme Hum.

Bodhisattva Recording Project

Part of Bodhisattva’s mission is to archive the sound files of the thousands of antique singing bowls that have passed through our business in the past 16 years.

One of the ways we seek to preserve this legacy is to develop and maintain strict standards on the quality of the recordings we produce, recording both the struck and rim tones of each singing bowl and Master Healing Set that we sell on our site.  In our Large Singing Bowl Galleries, we also record the fundamental (deeper) tones as well. These recordings have improved as technology and bandwidth have evolved, but improvement is a never ending quest.  We try to give our customers the most faithful experience of the bowls possible.  Our recording artist Son Vo (pictured left) has a wonderful hand on the bowls and scrubs the recordings clean of rim noise,  sirens, aircraft, traffic, dogs, crows, and other sounds of West Los Angeles daily life.

But the real impetus for this project is more personal – a desire for the bowls to be heard as broadly as possible, and for their sound to endure beyond their lifetimes.  So we’re creating an archive of this treasure trove of sound files, which will require a great deal of time to organize (we’re always looking for intern help with this project!).   I’m driven by the awareness of how relatively rare it is that this cross current of antique singing bowls should all flow through this time and place; and a sense of responsibility to document them all.  Especially the sets, as to our knowledge, there have never been recordings of singing bowl sets before.   And as we craft these handmade, very individual pieces together to form intervals and scales, I’m struck with the reality that these sets will not stay together forever.  So we seek to preserve the relationships of these bowls.  And the basic fabric of our recording will be woven with these sounds.

The Bodhisattva recording will also feature live sessions as well.  For the past two years, Son and I have been recording sessions with the bowls in the studios of Lotus Post, in Santa Monica, California. We did our first session with the inspiration to interweave one of our best diatonic sets together with one of our best pentatonic sets, utilizing not just striking tones, but all of the fundamental and rim tones as well.  Lotus Post’s founder, Michael Perricone, a bowl master himself, has been a driving force in helping us with the project as producer, engineer and at the onset of the project, a co-musician as well.

In our last antique collection, we received a flurry of concert-pitch Highwalls, four tuned to concert pitch on the fundamentals (C, A & two matching Fs) and two tuned concert pitch on the rims (E & G).  It was an anomaly that so many Highwalls tuned to whole tones should all come together in the same collection.  I have only completed one antique Highwall set and it took about four or five years to complete.  That set was matched on the rims, from a fifth octave C to a B (featured in our Crown Chakra Meditation video).  However, we had no recording of anything with whole tones mixed between the rims and fundamentals. So, on a beautiful, late summer evening, we took the bowls to Lotus Post to capture their resonance together, before they parted ways forever.

What I loved about this collection is that they all had something to say to each other, and I felt as though I was sitting in on a conversation conducted in a universal tongue.  Despite their varying densities, their timbres were well matched and I loved the interplay of the whole tones referencing each other across the octaves, with their flatted fifth harmonies dancing in between.   I felt so blessed to have been in the room when they all came together.

 Son and I have a rough layout of the sequencing,  but our “day jobs” come first!  So the project is slowly getting  done as soon as the flow of work allows.  Please stay tuned!

Initiated in 1999 by Jem Finer, this project is a composition of Tibetan singing bowls designed to play until 2999.  Click on the link below to listen.


Longplayer’s first live performance, The Roundhouse, 2009. [Atherton-Chiellino] [ENLARGE]

What is Longplayer?

Longplayer is a one thousand year long musical composition. It began playing at midnight on the 31st of December 1999, and will continue to play without repetition until the last moment of 2999, at which point it will complete its cycle and begin again. Conceived and composed by Jem Finer, it was originally produced as an Artangel commission, and is now in the care of the Longplayer Trust.

Longplayer can be heard in the lighthouse at Trinity Buoy Wharf, London, where it has been playing since it began. It can also be heard at several other listening posts around the world, and globally via a live stream on the Internet.  Longplayer started playing at three separate listening posts in London and Sydney at 00:00 hours (IDLE) on the 1st of January 2000 (i.e. midnight on the International Date Line – midday on the 31st of December 1999 in London).

Longplayer is composed for singing bowls – an ancient type of standing bell – which can be played by both humans and machines, and whose resonances can be very accurately reproduced in recorded form. It is designed to be adaptable to unforeseeable changes in its technological and social environments, and to endure in the long-term as a self-sustaining institution.

The listening post at the Lighthouse, Trinity Buoy Wharf, 2000. [Steve Pyke]

The Long Term

Longplayer grew out of a conceptual concern with problems of representing and understanding the fluidity and expansiveness of time. While it found form as a musical composition, it can also be understood as a living, 1000-year-long process – an artificial life form programmed to seek its own survival strategies. More than a piece of music, Longplayer is a social organism, depending on people – and the communication between people – for its continuation, and existing as a community of listeners across centuries.

An important stage in the development of the project was the establishment of the Longplayer Trust, a lineage of present and future custodians invested with the responsibility to research and implement strategies for Longplayer’s survival, to ask questions as to how it might keep playing, and to seek solutions for an unknown future.

Composition in Time

Longplayer is composed in such a way that the character of its music changes from day to day and – though it is beyond the reach of any one person’s experience – from century to century. It works in a way somewhat akin to a system of planets, which are aligned only once every thousand years, and whose orbits meanwhile move in and out of phase with each other in constantly shifting configurations. In a similar way, Longplayer is predetermined from beginning to end – its movements are calculable, but are occurring on a scale so vast as to be all but unknowable.

Longplayer’s composition uses a minimum amount of information and material to create the maximum amount of variety, in terms of both sound and form. While it is a system-based composition, it is made out of very expansive and resonant musical material, which in itself is not ‘systematic’ sounding. This material (the ‘source music’) is played on Tibetan singing bowls, which possess a simple but harmonically rich sound, and a quality which is at once both physical and ethereal. A simple form of synthesis arises from the interactions of these instruments’ waveforms, with the consequence that while Longplayer’s score is deterministic, its music at any given time is unpredictable.


At present, Longplayer is being performed mostly by computers. However, it was created with a full awareness of the inevitable obsolescence of this technology, and is not in itself bound to the computer or any other technological form.

Although the computer is a cheap and accurate device on which Longplayer can play, it is important – in order to legislate for its survival – that a medium outside the digital realm be found. To this end, one objective from the earliest stages of its development has been to research alternative methods of performance, including mechanical, non-electrical and human-operated versions.

Among these is a graphical score for six players and 234 singing bowls. The first performance based on this score took place over 1,000 minutes on 12 – 13 September, 2009, at the Roundhouse, London. Longplayer Live is performed on a vast, specially-constructed instrument by an orchestra of players working in shifts. A series of further performances are in planning for various venues around the world – see the Live page for more information.

The first Longplayer leaflet, 1999. [Artangel]

The first Longplayer leaflet, 1999. [Artangel]

Who Created Longplayer?

Longplayer was developed and composed by Jem Finer between October 1995 and December 1999, with the support and collaboration of Artangel. It was managed by Candida Blaker, with a think tank comprising artist Brian Eno, British Council Director of Music John Keiffer, landscape architect Georgina Livingston, Artangel co-director Michael Morris, digital sound artist Joel Ryan, architect and writer Paul Shepheard and writer and composer David Toop. A full account of Longplayer’s development can be found in the 2003 book Longplayer, published by Artangel, London.

Jem Finer is a UK-based artist, musician and composer. Since studying computer science in the 1970s, he has worked in a variety of fields, including photography, film, music and installation. Longplayer represents a convergence of many of his concerns, particularly those relating to systems, long-durational processes and extremes of scale in both time and space. Among his other works is Score For a Hole In the Ground (2005), a permanent musical installation in a forest in Kent. Self-sustaining and relying only on gravity and the elements to be audible, the project continues Finer’s interest in long-term sustainability and the reconfiguring of older technologies.

Based in London and working both in the UK and internationally, Artangel has been commissioning and producing ambitious projects by contemporary artists for the last two decades. Often surprising in both conception and scale, each project begins with an invitation to an artist to develop a new work, inspired and given shape by a particular place. Artangel works closely with the artist to realise the full potential of the work in whatever form, medium and context seems best. Since the early 1990s, Artangel has produced over fifty major new commissions including Rachel Whiteread’s House (1992), Michael Landy’s Breakdown (2001), Francis Alys’ Seven Walks (2005) and Heiner Goebbel’s Stifters Dinge (2008). Artangel is supported by the Arts Council of England and The Company of Angels. Visit for more information.

Proposed mechanical version, 2002. [Atelier One] [ENLARGE]

All content © 2012 The Longplayer Trust. Contact: . Designed and built by Moneymouth.

William at Down 2 Earth April 2012

William Ward, a former New Yorker who resides now in Pensacola, FL was a Chef for 13 years.  To relieve his job related stress, he discovered meditation.  He now has a full time sound healing practice and has been a Bodhisattva customer since 2009.  William will be playing his collection of Bodhisattva singing bowls on the program on 6/21/12.  We are in the process of building William a two-octave Master Healing set.


How did you get involved with bowls?

 That’s one of the most important questions.  It started with a meditation.  In a meditation, there was a sound that I can’t even begin to describe with words – it brought a knowing of an unconditional love that was there – just the deepest experience of peace I’d ever had.  What it taught me was that God was real within us, which was what I was looking for and was the reason I was meditating.  A few months later, I walked into a conscious living store, heard a CD playing and heard the bowls.  Tears of remembrance of the sound I experienced flooded me, and I knew I had to look into it.  And that’s how it all started.

You started with Crystal bowls? 

 The Crystal bowls and Tibetan bowls came at the same time.

What were you looking for?

 I was looking for what I had experienced in that sound and I wasn’t finding it everywhere.  That’s why I stuck with you guys. I’ve done a lot of research and looked around and you guys connected very well with everything I was looking for.

Did you study with any one?

I read some books, Mitchell Gaynor, “The Healing Power of Sound”, and Jonathan Goldman “Healing Sounds”.  They were both very helpful, as they expressed my experience in ways I couldn’t yet grasp with my own words. Reading up on it helped me to find my own words, for which I am eternally grateful.

So you never studied with anybody, but you read the books and got started from there?

 Yes.  It was more an intuition that just brought everything together – the more I worked with them and shared them, the more intuition expanded from the experience.  The experience was the knowing. I just followed that.

Please talk to me about how you integrate the Crystal and the Tibetan Bowls.  Usually people resonate with one or the other.

 What I was looking for was to recreate that sound in the experience I had – it is my wish for everyone to experience that for themselves. I found that to re-create that sound, I had to use more bowls, I had to fill in certain spaces.  And it opened my eyes to see how chords were playing while I was filling in the spaces, and it expanded from there.  I loved the harmonies and the timbres and the higher frequencies when I brought in the Tibetans.

Tell me how you work with the Chakras.

 I was very skeptical about the Chakras and didn’t understand them in the beginning. So I really put some time into understanding them for myself.  It’s psychosomatic, because our Chakras lie along our Central Nervous System.  I realized what effects our nervous system the most is our thoughts about reality. Who I think I am affects every way in which I will express myself.

We’re all spirit having a human experience; however, if I’m too connected to the human experience it limits that awareness.  Where our blocks happen is when we forget this reality.  Reality is itself the seen and the unseen working hand in hand.  I started seeing everything as vibration – whether you can see it or not, it is in vibrating form like an orchestra playing its song.  So when I say reality, everything in existence has its song that it’s singing, each component or instrument is vital for the whole composition.  And we as humans have that awareness of observation. So where and who we think we are, we are.  But we don’t have to stay there.  And that’s the correlation I was making with the Chakras being psychosomatic – reality is limitless, it always has been.

Usually when we hear the word psychosomatic, it refers to someone manifesting a physical condition simply by believing they have it.  Is that what you mean be psychosomatic?

Not manifesting, but knowing it to be true. For example, our Root Chakra is connected with physicality. And we can stop there, which most of us do, or we can look to see energetic origins of physicality, which would raise our awareness of that Chakra more.

How did you choose working with the diatonic scale system as the basis of the Chakras as opposed to any other system?

 I never put any thought to it, I just went where I was guided, which isn’t as simple as it sounds.  I just went with my intuition.  But I do love to learn how other people use their styles and techniques.

When you do your sessions, you just put the Tibetans on the body?

Almost always. Sometimes I’ll also place the crystal bowls on the body.

How do you decide that?

Each session is different.  There’s a knowing in the moment.  What I love about the bowls is that it’s not imparting a verbal knowledge to them, it’s sharing the experience with them, which is priceless.

Why do you do what you do?

 It was important for me when I experienced that peace within, that became my new passion.  And I know that when everyone can find that place that is within them, we will all know, so naturally, how we can move forward together, in a sustainable way for the environment, our children and their children.

Tell me about the show you’re doing.

 El – the host of Shift Happens radio – called me and said  that she’d heard from quite a few people about me, and she wanted me to come on for a two hour segment.  It will be airing 10 PM EST 6/21 and will be available on podcast afterward.

Tell me about the collection from BTC you will be using tomorrow.

I’ll definitely be using my C# Highwall and the Pentatonic set, and then I’ll use Pentatonic cup set if I have the spacing.  I have one E that was gifted to me that’s a 10 or a 12”, so I don’t know if I’ll have the space for it or not.  For the crystal bowls, I have an Alchemy set.

So you will be giving us that experience tomorrow.  We’re really looking forward to hearing it!

As part of our Guest Series, I’m delighted to share my conversation with Rona C, a psychiatrist from Feasterville, PA and a recent customer of Bodhisattva.  She was kind enough to discuss how she uses a Tibetan singing bowl in her work.

Tell us about your practice.

I am an outpatient psychiatrist in private practice in Feasterville, PA. I graduated from Duke Medical School in North Carolina and did my residency at Hahnemann University in Philadelphia PA.  I am board certified in psychiatry with added certification in geriatric psychiatry.  I have been in private practice for 24 years and see many patients suffering with anxiety and depression.

Do you think there has been an increase in the amount of cases you’re seeing for these disorders?

There seems to be an increase in the number of people suffering from these disorders. I believe this is partly due to the increasing stress and distortion in our world. Technology, which is so rapidly evolving, and while offering so many benefits has contributed greatly to this stress. Our daily lives and the expectations placed on us are straining our biology which has taken millenia to evolve.  Our bodies evolved in synchrony with the rhythms of nature, the yearly, seasonal, and circadian to name a few. Technology has made honoring these rhythms more irrelevant to our lives. This puts a strain on our bodies, minds and spirits and diseases such as depression and anxiety are triggered.

Humans evolved as social animals who  are influenced by and benefit from human contact on a physical and chemical (ie pheromone) level.  For instance, it is well documented that women living in close quarters become synchronized in their menstrual cycles.  We are deprived of this with the increase of long distance and virtual interactions.  It has been stated that thoughts and emotions have electromagnetic properties which can not be communicated as completely with this type of interaction. This attenuation in the intensity of the biological and electromagnetic communication contribute to a loss of grounding, a disconnection, a sense of isolation all which contribute to the rise of depression and anxiety.

It has been stated that abnormal reactions are normal in abnormal circumstances so perhaps this epidemic of anxiety and depression is in fact  a normal result of the present world.

How are you using the bowl in your practice?

The bowls have a calming soothing effect on my patients. Their beautiful song seems to resonate with and calm the nervous system in a sweet, non intrusive and nonthreatening way.  This morning I saw a woman with dental pain radiating to her face and neck.  When I played the bowl for her, she said that  it seemed to quiet the nerves.  People who are so anxious that even relaxation techniques escalate their stress can experience relief with the bowl.

Do you think this is a result of brainwave entrainment, or are there other factors?

Modern physics is teaches us that all matter in our bodies is composed of vibrating waves. I believe that the singing bowl helps to entrain the vibrations into a cohesive concordant as opposed to discordant pattern. I believe the brainwaves are also entrained and this then further enhances the entrainment of the rest of the body.

How do you use the bowl in a session?

I am still learning about the many ways to use the bowl in a therapeutic manner. I will never use it without first asking the patient’s permission. I’ll tell a patient “I’d like to play this bowl for you, I think it’s going to be very calming.  So sit back, try to relax, close your eyes and let it envelop you.” I instruct them to tell me if they need me to stop playing the bowl at any point. That has not happened yet though.  I also play the bowl between sessions to refuel and relax.

And what reactions are you getting?

People generally become more relaxed, sometimes they tap in to deep emotions. I played it for someone who was telling me about her 16 year old dog who was dying.  I played while she was talking, it seemed to help her connect more powerfully with the deep wells of emotion in her heart.

Do you feel that there is a potential for a lasting effect?

I do. The two minutes that I am able to play for my patients in my current practice format produces a temporary reprieve.  It’s like changing the channel from stress to contentment. But I feel a paradigm in which I have a set of healing bowls which could be played for a prolonged period could cause lasting healing.

Do you sense a potential for vibrational therapy to be used as an adjunct therapy in a clinical setting?  Would you consider prescribing a patient vibrational therapy as opposed to medication in certain circumstances?

I do feel there is great potential for adjunct use of vibrational therapy in a clinical setting and I hope to incorporate this into my own practice.  For certain patients such as those who cannot tolerate, have had a poor response to or prefer a holistic approach to that of a pharmaceutical approach, vibrational therapy is an intriguing alternative.


Antique Tibetan Singing Bowls do not merely sing. They communicate in a variety of ways, from their capacity as biofeedback instruments, to the informational subtext of their frequencies which we hear and feel in our bodies and energy fields as vibration. This blog will be based on my own experiences as well as those of customers and friends who have integrated the bowls into their healing and spiritual practices, and are guided by them as tools of discovery. I welcome all to share their experiences.

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